Funeral - Parish of Killay

THE PARISH OF KILLAY
St Hilary & St Martin
Y PLWYF CILÂ
PARISH OF KILLAY
The Church in Wales in the Diocese of Swansea & Brecon
St Hilary & St Martin
  PLWYF CILÂ

    

The loss of a loved one can be a difficult time, and your Parish Priest is there to offer help, comfort and support. Funeral services usually include the remembering of the person who has died, usually readings from the Bible, prayers (relating to the deceased person and to their family and friends), and hymns or other music. We have come together to commend our brother/sister N into the hands of Almighty God our heavenly Father.  In the presence of death, Christians have sure ground for hope and confidence,and even for joy, because the Lord Jesus Christ,who shared our human life and death, was raised again triumphant and lives for evermore.      In him his people find eternal life, and in this faith, we put our whole trust in his goodness and mercy.       From the Church in Wales Order for Christian Funerals Funeral Service in the Church in Wales At a Christian funeral we focus on a number of closely related things: we remember with thanksgiving the death and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ, commending to God’s everlasting mercy the person who has died. People often regard the committal at the graveside or crematorium as the climax of a funeral. Christians believe otherwise. For Christians, the real climax is the moment when the deceased person’s family, friends and Church commend them in faith to God’s eternal care. we celebrate all that was good in their earthly life, we express our natural sense of grief and loss, we are reminded of our own mortality Christian funeral services attempt to keep these various aims in balance and to integrate them into an act of worship which reflects our faith, our experience and our feelings. We express our faith in the risen Christ, remember the person who has died, read from the Bible and say appropriate prayers. Suitable hymns or other music may be included, though they do not have to be. The ritual actions include the carrying of the coffin into the church or other place chosen for the funeral, the optional setting up of appropriate symbols (of which the paschal candle, the Church’s sign of the light of the risen Christ has particular importance) in the vicinity of the coffin or even upon it, and the burial of the remains of the deceased person. See below about the burial of cremated remains. Special provision can also be made to assist the private reflection and devotion of those who have been bereaved: at home before the funeral, in church on the eve of the funeral, at home after the funeral. When a child or young person dies, the funeral has a different nature and the prayers and readings will reflect this. Since every funeral is different, the Church in Wales provides a very wide range of services. The family is invited to select the one which appears most appropriate to their own needs. For example: service in church and committal at the grave or crematorium, bringing of the coffin into church on the night before the funeral service which is followed by committal at the grave or crematorium, prayers at home followed by a service in church and committal at the grave or crematorium, the entire service and committal taking place at a crematorium or graveside, private burial or cremation with a subsequent memorial service, the burial of cremated remains in a cemetery or churchyard following a cremation, prayers at home after the funeral service, or on the anniversary of a death. Readings Among the Bible Readings suggested in the orders of service are: Matthew 5:1-12a (The Beatitudes) John 5:24-29; 6:37-40 (Seeing the Son and believing in him) John 11:21-27 (I am the resurrection and the life) Romans 8:31b-39 (Nothing will separate us from God’s love in Christ) I Corinthians 15:20-26,35-58 (Death, where is your victory?) Revelation 7:9-17 (God will wipe away every tear) Isaiah 61:1-3 (Good news for the broken hearted) Wisdom of Solomon 3:1-9 (No torment will touch them). Hymns There are many suitable hymns. Here is a small selection.(Please note: links go to pages with embedded audio that uses the Quicktime plugin to play). Abide with me; fast falls the eventide.  Guide me, O thou great Jehovah/Redeemer. How sweet the name of Jesus sounds. Jesus lives!  Lord of all hopefulness, Lord of all joy. O love that wilt not let me go. Praise, my soul, the king of heaven.  The Lord’s my shepherd, I’ll not want.  Thine be the glory, risen, conquering Son.
  How do I go about arranging a funeral? It is usual to consult a Funeral Director, who will advise on all practical aspects of the Funeral, make initial contact with a priest or minister on your behalf, and arrange for all payments which have to be made. The priest or minister will then visit you to discuss the details of the Funeral and offer pastoral care to you and your family. The deceased person may have left instructions about their Funeral, either in their Will or separately. If so, their wishes should be made known to the Funeral Director and the priest or minister.
Frequently Asked Questions
Can I be buried wherever I wish? As land available for burials becomes scarcer, your choice will tend to be restricted. Many churchyards are full, and no more burials are possible there. If there is space, the right of burial extends to those resident in or who die in the Parish. Permission can be given by the Parish Priest for other persons to be buried in the churchyard if there are good reasons for doing so. Municipal burial grounds are experiencing the same difficulties and are introducing similar regulations. The situation regarding cremated remains (following a cremation at a crematorium of your choice) is easier. Availability of space will depend on the circumstances of each individual churchyard and the Parish Priest can advise.
Who is responsible for keeping graves tidy in the churchyard? The Parochial Church Council is responsible for keeping the area generally tidy and safe, and the fees which are paid when a grave is opened or when a headstone is placed must be used by the PCC for Churchyard maintenance. The particular care of individual graves has to be undertaken by the family and friends of the deceased. If a headstone becomes unsafe, the PCC will seek to trace the family of the deceased to undertake the repairs. If not, the PCC is obliged to render it safe which can mean laying it flat, but it is then the responsibility of the family either to remove the stone or to re-install it in a safe condition. The PCC can recover its reasonable costs from the family
Do we have to accept the set form of service, or can we make up our own?  If a licensed Minister or Reader officiates at a funeral, they are authorised only to use the form of service approved by the Church in Wales. However, it is often possible to add to it at the request of the family, e.g. by incorporating a favourite reading which is not in the Bible, by offering a personal tribute, by adding chosen hymns and songs, and by bringing to the service objects or symbols associated with the departed person. Also, the service includes several options, and the family can discuss with the minister which of the alternative readings, prayers etc. are to be used.
What type of memorial stone can I erect? The Church in Wales Constitution defines the size and type of memorials that can be erected to mark burials and plots for cremated remains. These set the limits to the memorials that the Parish Priest or Archdeacon can authorise. Any memorials beyond these limits can only be erected if a Faculty is granted by the Diocesan Chancellor. Your Parish Priest can advise on these limits and give you the relevant application form to erect or modify a memorial, as well as advise on the Faculty procedure, if required. Generally, memorials outside the normal limits are discouraged.
Can I reserve a plot for my future burial? It is only possible to reserve a plot for future burial if a faculty is granted by the Diocesan Chancellor. Such reservations are only granted in exceptional circumstances and do not guarantee the type of memorial that can be erected.
Can I specify a ‘Green Burial’? The type of coffin is down to personal choice and thus an environmentally sound casket such as from willow or recycled cardboard is acceptable. Some Parishes are choosing to designate areas of churchyards as ‘green’ areas where burials will be unmarked by gravestones etc (though some form of location identification will be needed). Marking a grave by planting trees is not encouraged because of the long term liabilities that trees represent.
Copyright Parish of Killay 2018
Funerals are generally arranged through local Funeral Directors, but Canon Phillip can be contacted directly regarding a Killay or Tycoch Funeral. There are two Gardens of Remembrance where cremated remains of loved ones can be buried. For Tycoch – contact Canon Phillip, for Killay, please download the Application for Burial of Creamated Remains form (and also contact Canon Phillip).
? Application for Burial of Cremated Remains ? Funeral Service

Funeral - Parish of Killay

    

The loss of a loved one can be a difficult time, and your Parish Priest is there to offer help, comfort and support. Funeral services usually include the remembering of the person who has died, usually readings from the Bible, prayers (relating to the deceased person and to their family and friends), and hymns or other music. We have come together to commend our brother/sister N into the hands of Almighty God our heavenly Father.  In the presence of death, Christians have sure ground for hope and confidence,and even for joy, because the Lord Jesus Christ,who shared our human life and death, was raised again triumphant and lives for evermore.      In him his people find eternal life, and in this faith, we put our whole trust in his goodness and mercy.       From the Church in Wales Order for Christian Funerals Funeral Service in the Church in Wales At a Christian funeral we focus on a number of closely related things: we remember with thanksgiving the death and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ, commending to God’s everlasting mercy the person who has died. People often regard the committal at the graveside or crematorium as the climax of a funeral. Christians believe otherwise. For Christians, the real climax is the moment when the deceased person’s family, friends and Church commend them in faith to God’s eternal care. we celebrate all that was good in their earthly life, we express our natural sense of grief and loss, we are reminded of our own mortality Christian funeral services attempt to keep these various aims in balance and to integrate them into an act of worship which reflects our faith, our experience and our feelings. We express our faith in the risen Christ, remember the person who has died, read from the Bible and say appropriate prayers. Suitable hymns or other music may be included, though they do not have to be. The ritual actions include the carrying of the coffin into the church or other place chosen for the funeral, the optional setting up of appropriate symbols (of which the paschal candle, the Church’s sign of the light of the risen Christ has particular importance) in the vicinity of the coffin or even upon it, and the burial of the remains of the deceased person. See below about the burial of cremated remains. Special provision can also be made to assist the private reflection and devotion of those who have been bereaved: at home before the funeral, in church on the eve of the funeral, at home after the funeral. When a child or young person dies, the funeral has a different nature and the prayers and readings will reflect this. Since every funeral is different, the Church in Wales provides a very wide range of services. The family is invited to select the one which appears most appropriate to their own needs. For example: service in church and committal at the grave or crematorium, bringing of the coffin into church on the night before the funeral service which is followed by committal at the grave or crematorium, prayers at home followed by a service in church and committal at the grave or crematorium, the entire service and committal taking place at a crematorium or graveside, private burial or cremation with a subsequent memorial service, the burial of cremated remains in a cemetery or churchyard following a cremation, prayers at home after the funeral service, or on the anniversary of a death. Readings Among the Bible Readings suggested in the orders of service are: Matthew 5:1-12a (The Beatitudes) John 5:24-29; 6:37-40 (Seeing the Son and believing in him) John 11:21-27 (I am the resurrection and the life) Romans 8:31b-39 (Nothing will separate us from God’s love in Christ) I Corinthians 15:20-26,35-58 (Death, where is your victory?) Revelation 7:9-17 (God will wipe away every tear) Isaiah 61:1-3 (Good news for the broken hearted) Wisdom of Solomon 3:1-9 (No torment will touch them). Hymns There are many suitable hymns. Here is a small selection.(Please note: links go to pages with embedded audio that uses the Quicktime plugin to play). Abide with me; fast falls the eventide.  Guide me, O thou great Jehovah/Redeemer. How sweet the name of Jesus sounds. Jesus lives!  Lord of all hopefulness, Lord of all joy. O love that wilt not let me go. Praise, my soul, the king of heaven.  The Lord’s my shepherd, I’ll not want.  Thine be the glory, risen, conquering Son.
THE PARISH OF KILLAY
St Hilary & St Martin
Y PLWYF CILÂ
PARISH OF KILLAY
The Church in Wales in the Diocese of Swansea & Brecon
St Hilary & St Martin
  PLWYF CILÂ
  How do I go about arranging a funeral? It is usual to consult a Funeral Director, who will advise on all practical aspects of the Funeral, make initial contact with a priest or minister on your behalf, and arrange for all payments which have to be made. The priest or minister will then visit you to discuss the details of the Funeral and offer pastoral care to you and your family. The deceased person may have left instructions about their Funeral, either in their Will or separately. If so, their wishes should be made known to the Funeral Director and the priest or minister.
Frequently Asked Questions
Can I be buried wherever I wish? As land available for burials becomes scarcer, your choice will tend to be restricted. Many churchyards are full, and no more burials are possible there. If there is space, the right of burial extends to those resident in or who die in the Parish. Permission can be given by the Parish Priest for other persons to be buried in the churchyard if there are good reasons for doing so. Municipal burial grounds are experiencing the same difficulties and are introducing similar regulations. The situation regarding cremated remains (following a cremation at a crematorium of your choice) is easier. Availability of space will depend on the circumstances of each individual churchyard and the Parish Priest can advise.
Who    is    responsible    for    keeping    graves    tidy    in    the churchyard? The Parochial Church Council is responsible for keeping the area generally tidy and safe, and the fees which are paid when a grave is opened or when a headstone is placed must be used by the PCC for Churchyard maintenance. The particular care of individual graves has to be undertaken by the family and friends of the deceased. If a headstone becomes unsafe, the PCC will seek to trace the family of the deceased to undertake the repairs. If not, the PCC is obliged to render it safe which can mean laying it flat, but it is then the responsibility of the family either to remove the stone or to re-install it in a safe condition. The PCC can recover its reasonable costs from the family
Do   we   have   to   accept   the   set   form   of   service,   or   can we make up our own?  If a licensed Minister or Reader officiates at a funeral, they are authorised only to use the form of service approved by the Church in Wales. However, it is often possible to add to it at the request of the family, e.g. by incorporating a favourite reading which is not in the Bible, by offering a personal tribute, by adding chosen hymns and songs, and by bringing to the service objects or symbols associated with the departed person. Also, the service includes several options, and the family can discuss with the minister which of the alternative readings, prayers etc. are to be used.
What type of memorial stone can I erect? The Church in Wales Constitution defines the size and type of memorials that can be erected to mark burials and plots for cremated remains. These set the limits to the memorials that the Parish Priest or Archdeacon can authorise. Any memorials beyond these limits can only be erected if a Faculty is granted by the Diocesan Chancellor. Your Parish Priest can advise on these limits and give you the relevant application form to erect or modify a memorial, as well as advise on the Faculty procedure, if required. Generally, memorials outside the normal limits are discouraged.
Can I reserve a plot for my future burial? It is only possible to reserve a plot for future burial if a faculty is granted by the Diocesan Chancellor. Such reservations are only granted in exceptional circumstances and do not guarantee the type of memorial that can be erected.
Can I specify a ‘Green Burial’? The type of coffin is down to personal choice and thus an environmentally sound casket such as from willow or recycled cardboard is acceptable. Some Parishes are choosing to designate areas of churchyards as ‘green’ areas where burials will be unmarked by gravestones etc (though some form of location identification will be needed). Marking a grave by planting trees is not encouraged because of the long term liabilities that trees represent.
Copyright Parish of Killay 2018