Dear Friends Tear your cloak in two this November. The month of November sees the clocks having just dropped back an hour,so we have dark and often cold, nights.But at the end of the month we celebrate the coming of the light,with the bringing out of theAdvent wreaths and the preparations for the great festival of the Nativity with carols and candle-lit festivities.We also celebrate a number of saints in this liturgical month 1stAll Saints, 2nd All Souls,6th St.Illtud,11th Martin of Tours,22nd Cecilia (Patron saint of musicians) and 30th St.Andrew (Patron Saint of Scotland).To pick out one of these saints,to whom we have a church dedicated within our ClyneTrinity MinistryArea let’s look at St.Martin of Tours. This winter,when you next see someone who looks both poor and cold,think of Martin of Tours and the tiny church dedicated to him in Fairwood Road,Dunvant. This monk bishop,born in Pannonia (now Hungary) became one of the most popular saints of the MiddleAges. Martin’s father was a pagan officer in the RomanArmy and Martin was intended for the army as well.But from an early age Martin wanted to be a Christian and felt that,as a Christ ian, he could not serve the Roman Empire.Martin was imprisoned for this early ‘conscientious objection’,and not released until 357 when he was nearly 40. One day Martin met a nearly naked beggar at Amie ns. He took off his cloak,cut it in half and gave the half to the beggar.Soon after this,he had a dream in which Christ appeared to him wearing the half of the cloak which Martin had given away. Martin was the pioneer of western monasticism; he founded the fi rst monastery in the whole of Gaul about 360. He was made Bishop of Tours in 372 by popular demand of both his clergy and his people. As Bishop,Martin continued his simple life as a monk and evangelist. Christianity had been largely confined to the urban centres of population but Martin went further and took Christianity to the pagani (country-men). For the next 25 years this greatly loved Bishop travelled his diocese by donkey and by boat,preaching the
good news of Jesus Christ and helping his people to tear down their heathen temples and sacred trees. He was sought out for his healing prayers for the sick and also his defence of the faith from heretics. Martin’s emblem in English art is often that of a goose,whose annual migration is about this time of year.‘St Martin’s Summer’ in England is a spell of fine weather that sometimes occurs around 11th November. So let us draw our curtains to keep out the cold and dark,but let us also think of those who have no curtains to close – and are sleeping out in the cold dark nights of November in this fair city of ours. Your Friend and Vicar Canon Phillip
PARISH OF KILLAY
The Church in Wales in the Diocese of Swansea & Brecon
St Hilary & St Martin
PLWYF CILÂ
Copyright Parish of Killay 2018
Dear Friends Tear your cloak in two this November. The month of November sees the clocks having just dropped back an hour,so we have dark and often cold, nights.But at the end of the month we celebrate the coming of the light,with the bringing out of theAdvent wreaths and the preparations for the great festival of the Nativity with carols and candle-lit festivities.We also celebrate a number of saints in this liturgical month 1stAll Saints, 2nd All Souls,6th St.Illtud,11th Martin of Tours,22nd Cecilia (Patron saint of musicians) and 30th St.Andrew (Patron Saint of Scotland).To pick out one of these saints,to whom we have a church dedicated within our ClyneTrinity MinistryArea let’s look at St.Martin of Tours. This winter,when you next see someone who looks both poor and cold,think of Martin of Tours and the tiny church dedicated to him in Fairwood Road,Dunvant. This monk bishop,born in Pannonia (now Hungary) became one of the most popular saints of the MiddleAges. Martin’s father was a pagan officer in the RomanArmy and Martin was intended for the army as well.But from an early age Martin wanted to be a Christian and felt that,as a Christ ian, he could not serve the Roman Empire.Martin was imprisoned for this early ‘conscientious objection’,and not released until 357 when he was nearly 40. One day Martin met a nearly naked beggar at Amie ns. He took off his cloak,cut it in half and gave the half to the beggar.Soon after this,he had a dream in which Christ appeared to him wearing the half of the cloak which Martin had given away. Martin was the pioneer of western monasticism; he founded the fi rst monastery in the whole of Gaul about 360. He was made Bishop of Tours in 372 – by popular demand of both his clergy and his people. As Bishop,Martin continued his simple life as a monk and evangelist. Christianity had been largely confined to the urban centres of population but Martin went further and took Christianity to the pagani (country-men). For the next 25 years this greatly loved Bishop travelled his diocese by donkey and by boat,preaching the
good news of Jesus Christ and helping his people to tear down their heathen temples and sacred trees. He was sought out for his healing prayers for the sick and also his defence of the faith from heretics. Martin’s emblem in English art is often that of a goose,whose annual migration is about this time of year.‘St Martin’s Summer’ in England is a spell of fine weather that sometimes occurs around 11th November. So let us draw our curtains to keep out the cold and dark,but let us also think of those who have no curtains to close – and are sleeping out in the cold dark nights of November in this fair city of ours. Your Friend and Vicar Canon Phillip
Copyright Parish of Killay 2018
PARISH OF KILLAY
The Church in Wales in the Diocese of Swansea & Brecon
St Hilary & St Martin
PLWYF CILÂ