Dear  Friends Have you taken yours down yet? Epiphany,   or   Three   Kings'   Day,   is   the   12th   day   of   Christmas,   with   January   6   marking   the   official   end   to   the   festive   season   for   many Christians.   These   days,   we   tend   to   associate   Twelfth   Night   with   removing   Christmas   decorations   because   according   to   tradition,   anyone who   forgets   to   take   them   down   by   the   night   before   Epiphany   must   leave   them   in   place   all   year   to   avoid   misfortune.   However,   up   until   the 19th   century,   the   Epiphany   was   more   important   than   Christmas   Day,   and   it   was   used   to   celebrate   both   the   three   kings'   ( or   three    wise men's ) visit to Jesus shortly after his   birth and also Jesus' baptism by John the Baptist. Doesn’t   everywhere   seem   so   dull   and   drab   after   taking   down   the   Christmas   tree   ( and   hoovering   up   all   the   needles! ),   repacking   all   the tinsel   and   baubles   and   generally   putting   things   around   the   house   back   in   their   rightful   place?   We   look   back   on   the   many   packed   carol services, and the great look of expectation on the faces of small children in the glow of the candle in their Christingle. Now   we   must   face   the   depths   of   winter   and   the   next   named   storm.   We   look   tentatively   into   the   start   of   a   New   Year   -   the   next   stage   of our   spiritual   journey   as   Christians.   As   I   write,   so   the   news   is   telling   of   the   removal   of   the   Severn   Bridge   tolls   to   enter   Wales.   It   is   now free to enter ‘God’s own country’. Then there’s Brexit – deal or no deal? ( reminds me of   a tv game show ). We   need   to   enter   2019   with   a   sense   of   hope   and   expectation   –   trusting   in   God.   Over   recent   weeks   and   months,   I   have   been   aware   of   a number   of   healing   miracles   within   our   congregations.   Several   incidences   have   occurred   of   surprising   financial   income   at   the   very   times that   particular   churches   needed   it.   God   cares   for   us,   provides   for   us,   has   a   plan   for   us   in   2019   as   in   former   years.   In   a   difficult   time   of changes   and   upheaval,   one   thing   is   constant,   God’s   love   and   care   for   us.   And   just   like   those   travelling   over   the   Severn   Bridge   crossings, God ’s love is free! As   a   Ministry   Area,   we   need   to   re-group   and,   following   prayer   and   reflection,   seek   out   what   is   God’s   Plan   for   Clyne   Trinity,   it’s   churches and   people   as   we   journey   together   forwards.   We   travel   forwards,   not   knowing   where   the   next   steps   will   lead   us.   But   God   knows.   Isn’t   it interesting   how   much   trust   we   put   in   plumbers   and   car   mechanics   –   how   much   more   trust   should   we   place   in   an   all   powerful,   all   knowing God, one who loves us and wants the best for us. Plumbers and car mechanics don’t care for, or love us, they simply want their invoices paid promptly. So   our   worship   needs   to   retain   the   colour   and   vibrancy   of   Christmas.   Any   blank   spaces   in   our   lives,   we   need   to   fill   with   the   Jesus   who walks alongside us every step of 2019 – wherever those steps lead. May God continue to bless each one of us, and our church families as we look at what the New Year brings. Canon Phillip
Copyright Parish of Killay 2018
PARISH OF KILLAY
The Church in Wales in the Diocese of Swansea & Brecon
St Hilary & St Martin
  PLWYF CILÂ
Dear  Friends Have you taken yours down yet? Epiphany,   or   Three   Kings'   Day,   is   the   12th   day   of   Christmas, with   January   6   marking   the   official   end   to   the   festive   season for    many    Christians.    These    days,    we    tend    to    associate Twelfth   Night   with   removing   Christmas   decorations   because according   to   tradition,   anyone   who   forgets   to   take   them   down by   the   night   before   Epiphany   must   leave   them   in   place   all year   to   avoid   misfortune.   However,   up   until   the   19th   century, the   Epiphany   was   more   important   than   Christmas   Day,   and   it was   used   to   celebrate   both   the   three   kings'   ( or   three    wise men's )   visit   to   Jesus   shortly   after   his    birth   and   also   Jesus' baptism by John the Baptist. Doesn’t   everywhere   seem   so   dull   and   drab   after   taking   down the    Christmas    tree    ( and    hoovering    up    all    the    needles! ), repacking    all    the    tinsel    and    baubles    and    generally    putting things   around   the   house   back   in   their   rightful   place?   We   look back on the many packed carol services, and the great look of expectation   on   the   faces   of   small   children   in   the   glow   of   the candle in their Christingle. Now   we   must   face   the   depths   of   winter   and   the   next   named storm.   We   look   tentatively   into   the   start   of   a   New   Year   -   the next   stage   of   our   spiritual   journey   as   Christians.   As   I   write, so   the   news   is   telling   of   the   removal   of   the   Severn   Bridge tolls    to    enter    Wales.    It    is    now    free    to    enter    ‘God’s    own country’.   Then   there’s   Brexit   –   deal   or   no   deal?   ( reminds   me of   a tv game show ). We   need   to   enter   2019   with   a   sense   of   hope   and   expectation –   trusting   in   God.   Over   recent   weeks   and   months,   I   have   been aware     of     a     number     of     healing     miracles     within     our congregations.   Several   incidences   have   occurred   of   surprising financial   income   at   the   very   times   that   particular   churches needed   it.   God   cares   for   us,   provides   for   us,   has   a   plan   for   us in   2019   as   in   former   years.   In   a   difficult   time   of   changes   and upheaval,   one   thing   is   constant,   God’s   love   and   care   for   us. And    just    like    those    travelling    over    the    Severn    Bridge crossings, God ’s love is free! As   a   Ministry   Area,   we   need   to   re-group   and,   following   prayer and   reflection,   seek   out   what   is   God’s   Plan   for   Clyne   Trinity, it’s   churches   and   people   as   we   journey   together   forwards.   We travel   forwards,   not   knowing   where   the   next   steps   will   lead us.   But   God   knows.   Isn’t   it   interesting   how   much   trust   we   put in   plumbers   and   car   mechanics   –   how   much   more   trust   should we   place   in   an   all   powerful,   all   knowing   God,   one   who   loves   us and wants the best for us. Plumbers   and   car   mechanics   don’t   care   for,   or   love   us,   they simply want their invoices paid promptly. So   our   worship   needs   to   retain   the   colour   and   vibrancy   of Christmas.   Any   blank   spaces   in   our   lives,   we   need   to   fill   with the    Jesus    who    walks    alongside    us    every    step    of    2019    wherever those steps lead. May   God   continue   to   bless   each   one   of   us,   and   our   church families as we look at what the New Year brings. Canon Phillip
Copyright Parish of Killay 2018
PARISH OF KILLAY
The Church in Wales in the Diocese of Swansea & Brecon
St Hilary & St Martin
  PLWYF CILÂ
Copyright Parish of Killay 2018